Keep the Ban!

Kim Stevens

Kim Stevens

Campaign Director, Environment Colorado

"Lifting the oil export ban would be a blessing for the oil companies but a curse for the climate and our health. To avoid more devastating impacts of global warming, including dangerous wildfires, reduced snowpack and pine beetle kill, like we've seen here in Colorado, we need to keep fossil fuels in the ground and transition to 100-percent pollution-free energy."

Sen. Chuck Grassley

Sen. Chuck Grassley

R-IA

"I'm all for fair and free trade... What bothers me is that Big Oil is pushing Congress to repeal the [crude oil export] ban while at the same time continues to attack and undermine domestic renewable fuels... Iowa doesn't produce any crude oil or natural gas. But, Iowa's farmers lead the nation in the production of homegrown, renewable, clean ethanol and biodiesel... Congress created the Renewable Fuel Standard to guarantee that consumers have a choice to buy clean, renewable fuel ... If Big Oil wants to get the export ban lifted, I'd suggest they end their selfish pursuits to repeal the RFS."

Collin O'Mara

Collin O'Mara

President and Chief Executive Officer, National Wildlife Federation

"Most arguments are about the implications for gas prices, refining jobs and domestic output, or about the geopolitical ramifications of growing Russian and eventually Iranian oil exports. Missing in the debate are the consequences for the nation's wildlife... Increasing oil production will further degrade more than a million square acres of wildlife habitat and threaten at-risk species. It will also adversely affect the experiences of millions of American hunters, anglers and other outdoor enthusiasts, as well as the local jobs that support these activities."

Roy Houseman

Roy Houseman

Spokesperson, United Steelworkers

"Our members have done everything they can to comply with federal regulations on clean air... One of the reasons they have been able to afford that is the oil export ban."

Rep. Kathy Castor

Rep. Kathy Castor

D-FL

"[Passing a bill to lift the crude oil export ban would be] an unconscionable giveaway to Big Oil."

Rep. Jan Schakowsky

Rep. Jan Schakowsky

D-IL

"Every barrel exported...will have to be replaced by a barrel of imported oil."

Matt Lee-Ashley

Matt Lee-Ashley

Director, Public Lands Project, Center for American Progress

"The potential environmental impacts of facilitating more U.S. crude oil exports are far-reaching and costly and would affect communities in the United States and around the world. Lawmakers should gain a better grasp of these consequences before rushing ahead with a decision that would have such profound effects on U.S. energy, economic, and environmental policy."

(joint statement with Alison Cassady)

Alison Cassady

Alison Cassady

Director, Domestic Energy Policy, Center for American Progress

"The potential environmental impacts of facilitating more U.S. crude oil exports are far-reaching and costly and would affect communities in the United States and around the world. Lawmakers should gain a better grasp of these consequences before rushing ahead with a decision that would have such profound effects on U.S. energy, economic, and environmental policy."

(joint statement with Matt Lee-Ashley)

Mike Bale

Mike Bale

Organizer, Local 30 Plumbers Union, Billings, Montana

"As we export crude oil, we will be exporting jobs."

Jeffrey Warmann

Jeffrey Warmann

Chief Executive Officer, Monroe Energy Inc.

"By lifting export restrictions and sending our crude overseas, we would be sending American jobs overseas as well. Our refineries would lie dormant once again. Refineries in Europe - where there is currently excess refining capacity - would be more than happy to refine our homegrown crude with the help of European workers. In other words, repealing the law will benefit European refinery workers at the expense of thousands of American jobs."

Clayton Aldern

Clayton Aldern

Fellow, Grist

"Ending the crude oil export ban would represent one of the largest tweaks in US energy policy in decades, and, from an environmental perspective, not a positive one."

Franz Matzner

Franz Matzner

Director, Beyond Oil Initiative, Natural Resources Defense Council

"The move to try to lift the crude-oil export limitation is really a way to invest in the past instead of the future... We should be investing in real energy security and real environmental security, which means resources like wind and solar that don't run out, don't blow up, don't pollute our air and more importantly don't lock consumers into this endless roller-coaster ride driven by foreign oil markets that we can't possibly control."

Doug O'Malley

Doug O'Malley

Director, Environment New Jersey

"Recently, the US House Energy and Commerce Committee approved legislation for lifting the ban on American crude oil exports. Lifting this ban would mean more drilling in the United States, and an increase in carbon pollution of up to 515 million metric tons annually — as much as adding 135 new coal power plants. This is the exact opposite of weaning ourselves off foreign oil... We need to keep more fossil fuels in the ground, not drill it, ship it and burn it, while global warming passes the point of no return."

Obama Administration

Obama Administration

"This is a policy decision that is made over at the Commerce Department, and for that reason, we wouldn't support legislation [to repeal the oil export ban] like the one that's been put forward by Republicans... The administration believes that the American people are better served by making sure that we pursue the kind of approach that also invests in renewable energy."

Hillary Clinton

Hillary Clinton

Democratic Presidential Candidate, 2016; former Secretary of State, Obama Administration

"In general, in the absence of a broader energy plan that does include concessions from the oil and gas industry, I don't think the ban should be lifted."

Kurt Cobb

Kurt Cobb

Contributor, EconMatters

"Until the country figures out how to get along without the millions of barrels of oil it imports each day, oil exports will only increase our dependence on foreign oil — which will have to be shipped in to replace the oil that would now be exported. This might lead to increased efficiencies in the oil industry as each type of crude would more easily reach the refineries best suited to refine it. But it's hard to see how oil exports would make the United States more energy secure... And, that was the reason behind banning oil exports in the first place."

Rick Bass

Rick Bass

Former Oil and Gas Geologist

"US gasoline consumption is declining. But oil companies aren't counting on selling Arctic Ocean oil domestically. Instead they hope to export that oil, and to further these ends they're pushing Congress to lift the current crude oil export ban. It is this driving hunger, this mindless habit for more oil that overtakes logical thinking and the ability to make prudent decisions to protect our natural resources."

Rep. Frank Pallone Jr.

Rep. Frank Pallone Jr.

D-NJ

"The bill before us prohibits any official of the federal government from imposing or enforcing any restriction on the exports of crude oil in any circumstance... Not for reasons of national security, not for adverse consumer impacts, not for public safety, and certainly not for impacts to the environment. And I think this is dangerous and misguided."

Rep. Bobby Rush

Rep. Bobby Rush

D-IL

"Before opening the door to this global market, I must feel confident that underrepresented communities all around this country would indeed benefit from the opportunities that will come from lifting this ban."

* Represents a change in viewpoint from a previously published quote

Karl Frisch

Karl Frisch

Executive Director, Allied Progress

"We've made such progress over the last decade toward energy independence and the idea that we would march away from that is crazy, especially with what has been going on in the Middle East."

Athan Manuel

Athan Manuel

Lobbyist, Sierra Club

"It's a bad idea from the global warming standpoint, in particular... [And] from a political standpoint, it's a bad idea to embolden the oil industry with a big legislative win for them."

Cyrus Sanati

Cyrus Sanati

Columnist, Fortune Magazine

"While the lifting of the export ban in its entirety would be a coup for some US oil producers, as the local crude benchmark would rise to match international prices, it would be bad for pretty much everyone else. Refiners would see their margins take a hit because of the increase in crude and would thus try to pass on as much of that extra cost as possible on to its customers at the pump. Higher gas prices are never a good thing, especially in an election year."

Sen. Martin Heinrich

Sen. Martin Heinrich

D-NM

"I think the proponents are making some very persuasive arguments on this front... But I think before we make such a monumental shift in US policy, I hope we can agree to expand our existing policy incentives for carbon-free energy sources."

Sen. Angus King

Sen. Angus King

I-ME

"I might be prepared to support it, but only if there's a more balanced package of changes in the bill, for example, extension of the renewable credits for wind and solar, other kinds of environmental and renewable energy supports."

David Turnbull

David Turnbull

Campaigns Director, Oil Change International

"The hazardous increases in oil production that could come with the removal or weakening of the crude export ban presents much greater dangers that simply cannot be ignored. Everyday, dangerous fracking wells, sprawling rail lines carrying so-called "bomb trains" and a network of leaking pipelines threaten our communities with spills and explosions with far-too-frequent regularity. If the highest estimates of increased oil production are realized, eliminating the crude oil export ban could lead to as much as a doubling of crude-by-rail traffic from today's already perilous levels... We have dug ourselves an enormous climate hole that will take tremendous resolve to claw ourselves out of. Removing the crude export ban only serves to dig that hole deeper. It fails the climate test and would be a step in the wrong direction for this nation's climate and energy policy."

Anthony Swift

Anthony Swift

Staff Attorney—International Program, Natural Resources Defense Council

"Lifting the long-standing ban of crude oil exports will expand the industrial oil patch in America's backyard, bringing with it a host of impacts to our waters, communities, ranches and farms, as international markets incentivize producers to expand fracking and send more mile long oil trains through our towns and cities. The national debate over lifting the crude oil export ban is a damaging distraction from the urgent challenge of reducing our nation's carbon emissions and transitioning to a clean energy economy."

Alan Stevens

Alan Stevens

President, Stancil & Co.

"Allowing the export of crude would cause domestic gasoline, jet fuel, diesel, and heating oil prices to increase [and] allowing exports of domestic crude would have a negative impact on the US trade balance... Lifting the crude export ban would result in a domestic crude price increase of approximately $3.00 per barrel, thereby eliminating the incentive to export products. This would have significant implications on the US refining industry, including: Lower refinery utilization and/or possible refinery closures; Increased imports of crude and refined products; The impact of increased petroleum product costs would impact all consumers of gasoline, jet fuel, diesel, and heating oil. These consumers are not only the driving public, but also airlines, trucking companies, railroads, etc., which would increase their cost of services to cover the increased fuel costs."

Robert Wisness

Robert Wisness

Owner, Wisness Seed Farm; former President, North Dakota Grain Growers Association

"Agriculture is the most energy-dependent industry in America so farmers bear the brunt of every hurricane, Middle East uprising, oil spill, mythical shortage and politician's whim as crude oil, fuel and fertilizer prices unjustifiably skyrocket every time... Now the American oil industry wants the ability to export the very oil that is produced on millions of acres of American farmland... The payback for agriculture may eventually come in the form of stable- priced, reliable fuel and fertilizer supplies, but that will not happen if our oil is allowed to leave. We like to think we need each other but to coexist, it must be a two-way street ... Exporting American crude oil is a bad idea whose time has not come."

Rep. Mike Doyle

Rep. Mike Doyle

D-PA

"Why wouldn't we be talking about taking this excess light sweet crude and retooling our refinery capacity and keeping it right here in the United States? ... As policymakers we are supposed to be thinking 20, 30, 40 years down the road for the next generation... not how people can make some more money in the oil industry."

Frank Rusco

Frank Rusco

Director - Natural Resources and Environment-Energy Issues, US Government Accountability Office

"[Lifting the crude oil export ban] could lead to incrementally more injuries or environmental damage."

Sam Lowe

Sam Lowe

Campaigner, Friends of the Earth

"In the European Union, US oil barons have found themselves an unlikely ally. The EU is explicitly asking the US to lift prohibitive restrictions, not only on crude oil exports but also on the export of liquefied natural gas... If we are to avoid the most severe impacts of climate change, 80% of known fossil fuel reserves must remain in the ground. It is inexcusable that the EU is pushing for measures in a trade deal that would — as envisioned — likely lead to more investment sunk into fossil fuel exploration, extraction, processing and transport, and in doing so potentially lock in high carbon dirty energy for the foreseeable future."

Jacob Dweck

Jacob Dweck

Partner, Sutherland, Asbill & Brennan LLP

"The lack of a domestic crude oil discount has the natural effect of defusing the political urgency of lawmakers or the administration having to do something to help producers... For the time being, the condensate export solution seems to have mooted or at a minimum tamed the price argument for crude exports."

Kirk Lippold

Kirk Lippold

Retired U.S. Navy Commander

"We still import a staggering amount of oil... Lifting export regulations may have the unintended consequence of undermining our national security goal of energy independence."

Justin Mikulka

Justin Mikulka

Reporter, DeSmogBlog

"The oil industry has been pushing the message that lifting the oil export ban will lower gas prices in the US and the industry hopes the American public will buy into the phony idea that the oil industry really cares about poor people and "lifting living standards" everywhere... In reality, lifting the export ban would mean the expansion of fracking in the US and increased oil production and consumption that climate scientists tell us we can ill afford."

Tim Ream

Tim Ream

Climate and Energy Campaign Director, WildEarth Guardians

"If Congress ends the oil export ban, you'll pay more for gas and there will be more oil profit and more fracking."

Marcie Keever

Marcie Keever

Oceans and Vessels Program Director, Friends of the Earth

"Repealing the ban would open the floodgates to more crude oil extraction and the burning of petroleum products, which would worsen the impacts of climate disruption."

The Columbian (Clark County, WA)

The Columbian (Clark County, WA)

"As the United States enjoys a boom in oil production, common sense dictates that the oil should remain at home, providing American refinery jobs and reducing the nation's reliance upon oil imports. Common sense also dictates that it is unconscionable that a Senate hearing featuring experts and legislators did not include a single mention of the environmental impact of exporting oil... Lifting a ban on exports would be a bad idea for the United States, both economically and environmentally. And with Vancouver in the midst of the oil debate, that means it would be a bad idea for us."

Karthik Ganapathy

Karthik Ganapathy

USA Communications Manager, 350.org

"It feels ridiculous to have a discussion about lifting the ban on oil exports and not talk about climate change... What it boils down to is lifting the ban encourages and incentivizes oil production in the US, and that's the wrong direction."

Brad Markell

Brad Markell

Executive Director—Industrial Union Council, AFL-CIO

"If we lift the ban on crude oil exports, we will export both our oil and the jobs and economic activity associated with refining that oil."

Patti Goldman

Patti Goldman

Managing Attorney, Earthjustice

"Eroding the crude oil export ban in place for more than 40 years is incredibly controversial. At a time when the nation has made a commitment to reduce climate-warming emissions and the renewable energy sector is going gangbusters in job creation, US energy policy should reject any measure that encourages more drilling and more production of highly polluting crude oil. Decisions like this by the [Bureau of Industry and Security] need to be transparent and made with full public participation."

Yvonne Cather

Yvonne Cather

Chair, Sierra Club—Kansas Chapter

"We don't need to export our oil unless you have stock in companies that make a profit off of it. In fact, in a few years we really are going to need a lot less of this stuff for good. And that's a good thing."

John T. Johnson III

John T. Johnson III

Board Member, Arlington Convention and Visitors Bureau Board of Directors

"Who is it that my state representative, Joe Barton, and his band of brothers is truly supporting? Their constituents or Big Oil? ... Nary a cent of my business income is derived from any facet of the oil and gas industry. Most Texas household incomes are not, nor are most in the US. We are all celebrating low prices at the pump... When I save $20+ per fill-up, I like it. It stays in my pocket. I spend it on other things that generate tax revenue for the state... Furthermore, this country is not energy independent. Why does Barton want to export crude oil when we are still importing? Make sense? Not to me."

Sam Schabacker

Sam Schabacker

Mountain West Region Organizer, Food & Water Watch

"The impact of [allowing exports] will be pretty dire in a couple of ways. First and foremost, this would be a sweetheart giveaway to the oil and gas industry. A lot of people in the industry have been salivating over the prospect of getting to take the fracked oil that has been increasingly in abundance in the United States and ship it overseas to countries like China or India or continents like Europe. And we can be certain that if this bill goes forward to fast-track the export of oil, fracked oil, or even fracked natural gas, we're going to see thousands more fracking wells next to homes and schools, as we have seen in Texas, in New Mexico, in Pennsylvania, in my home state of Colorado ... The second concern is, of course, if you start exporting this resource overseas, there is a question of what that will do to the cost of getting that resource in the United States. For many consumers, folks that are working, that are just barely able to make ends meet, the prospect of seeing their home heating costs go up because of this export bill, that's not a satisfactory one, that's not one that they're looking and excited to have to add to the long list of costs that they're already trying to take and make ends meet with."

Rex J. Zedalis

Rex J. Zedalis

Professor of Law, The University of Tulsa

"There can be no doubt that the current nearly 50% discount in crude oil prices over this past summer affects the oil industry and its suppliers. It also affects the stores and employees where industry income is spent, as well as the state governments in "oil country" that would otherwise benefit from the additional tax revenue... While this is far from helpful to efforts to jump-start the nation's economy and rapidly move away from the depths of the financial crisis and its ensuing recession, there are several reasons why it would be a mistake to believe lifting the current embargo on oil exports would cure the price problems bedeviling the oil industry... Perhaps one can disagree over whether the long-standing US restrictions on exports of domestic crude should be lifted. From the standpoint of seeking "true" (rather than mere rhetorical) energy independence, however, the course is crystal clear. What's certain regarding export restrictions is that any suggestion they should be lifted because such will boost the price of oil is unlikely to be received favorably by consumers."

Sandy Dechert

Sandy Dechert

Contributor, Clean Technica

"We extract enough shale gas that we can now afford to export it. This harms other nations in terms of postponing development of cleaner renewable energies and promoting instant gratification and chauvinist greed. Eventually, too, through the atmosphere, surface air, water, and soil, the poisons will come back to us... Not only does the United States ignore domestic and world priorities by using and exporting fracked resources, but we set a horrible example. Shooting for energy independence, we hypocritically turn our backs on sustainability, develop toxic and increasingly costly extraction and production methods that developing nations can exploit at speed, if they choose to, and invest in frail partnerships like the joint ventures in the arctic that have become lost assets because someone crossed a line in the Ukraine... Some estimators of projected US shale reserves – including independent analyst, author, and investor Bill Powers – see them declining much, much faster than the US Energy Information Administration estimates. Others see them peaking by the end of the decade, perhaps sooner... So what happens then? So much for energy independence. Better to spend our limited cash on something that's going to last."

John Podesta

John Podesta

Counselor to the President, Climate Change and Energy Policy, Obama Administration

"At this stage, I think that what the Commerce Department did in December [allowing the export of condensate] sort of resolves the debate. We felt comfortable with where they went ... If you look at what's going on in the market and actions that the Department took, I think that ... there's not a lot of pressure to do more."

Jay Hauck

Jay Hauck

Executive Director, Consumers and Refiners United for Domestic Energy (CRUDE)

"Put simply, a change in policy would mean the added value comes from abroad, not from here at home. To add injury to insult: American crude would be shipped over to Europe, refined there, and then those products would be sold back to us at a higher price than if the crude oil were refined in the United States... Meanwhile, shipping domestically-produced crude oil overseas would mean less domestic crude oil is being refined here in the United States, while we are still importing about 45% of our daily demand! Prices here would inevitably rise, in effect creating a massive tax increase - perpetrated by Congress."

Arthur Berman

Arthur Berman

Geological Consultant

"Whatever outcome results from the debate over petroleum exports, it will result in higher prices for American consumers. There are experts who argue that it won't increase prices much and that the economic benefits will outweigh higher costs. That may be but I doubt that anyone knows for sure. Everyone agrees that oil and gas will cost more if we allow exports."

Stephen Kretzmann

Stephen Kretzmann

Executive Director and Founder, Oil Change International

"Removing the crude export ban would be a disaster for the climate... President Obama and the US Congress need to stand up to Big Oil and defend the current regulations if he is actually serious about addressing our climate crisis... Big Oil's push for deregulation is all about profits and nothing more, no matter the consequences for our climate and communities... To push for more oil drilling at a time when our communities are facing climate chaos everyday is to deny the reality of climate change."

Jonathan Chanis

Jonathan Chanis

Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University

"If you give domestic sellers the option of selling crude oil internationally, they would have more buyers and the realized price should go up... However, there could be negative implications for California. The export ban often slightly lowers the price of crude in California because Alaskan production is essentially captive to that market."

Michael A. Levi

Michael A. Levi

Director, Maurice R. Greenberg Center for Geoeconomic Studies

"It runs against the conventional wisdom about what oil security means... Something seems upside-down when we say energy security means producing oil and sending it somewhere else."

Carl Pope

Carl Pope

Former Executive Director, Sierra Club

"We shouldn't allow the export of US crude oil - unless we also want to guarantee the continuation of sky high OPEC prices."

Brendan E. Williams

Brendan E. Williams

Senior Vice President of Advocacy, American Fuel & Petrochemical Manufacturers (AFPM)

"While some argue we may need to immediately advance a policy of unrestricted exports due to an over saturation of domestic, light crude oil... we are far from the point of such saturation. Utilization increases, crude mix adjustments, import exchanges and refining investments will allow at least a million barrels more light crude oil to be manufactured into finished products domestically in the short term. We have plenty of time to discuss and better understand the implications of crude oil exports, as well as to address other regulations imposing barriers to free trade."

Leo W. Gerard

Leo W. Gerard

International President, United Steelworkers

"Lifting the ban would benefit oil companies that engage in oil exploration and production, but it would harm their refining operations that have to purchase crude at the market price... It also would hurt independent refiners that do not engage in oil exploration."

Gary Beevers

Gary Beevers

International Vice President, United Steelworkers

"Lifting the crude oil export ban would harm U.S. refineries and workers... Oil companies that engage in exploration and production would reap huge profits at the expense of their refining units that have to buy oil on the open market. Also harmed would be independent refiners that do not engage in oil exploration... The reasons for not ending the crude oil export ban are obvious... Congress and the administration should not even be considering incremental legislation that would lift the ban in stages."

Thomas O'Malley

Thomas O'Malley

Executive Chairman, PBF Energy

"Lifting the oil export ban will raise prices for US refiners... The math is simple on this action: Removing export ban = higher oil prices = higher gasoline prices = angry voters."

Jeremy Nichols

Jeremy Nichols

Climate and Energy Program Director, WildEarth Guardians

"I think the last thing we need to be talking about is exporting fossil fuels... We're struggling to try to rein in carbon pollution as a nation... The American people want to see action and are concerned about the costs in increased pollution or a failure to reduce carbon pollution effectively. If we're talking about exporting oil, we're just talking about burning it somewhere else."

Philip Rinaldi

Philip Rinaldi

Chief Executive Officer/Principal Partner, Philadelphia Energy Solutions LLC

"[Loosening exports is] a very bad idea... I would prefer to be adding value and selling to others, rather than behaving as if we were a colony to the rest of the world and selling them the raw materials so that they could add value and sell us back expensive products."

Michael C. Jennings

Michael C. Jennings

President and Chief Executive Officer, HollyFrontier Corp.

"Crude exports on the part of a country that imports nearly half of its crude oil requirements are, in our view, very unlikely to improve energy security or advance national interest, as we will simply make ourselves more dependent upon crude oil imports as we export our own crude."

Rep. Kevin McCarthy

Rep. Kevin McCarthy

R-CA, House Majority Leader

"[Mr. McCarthy isn't ready to support lifting or relaxing the nation's decades-old ban on oil exports, although he fully endorses exporting natural gas.] "We actually get a little premium where our oil is cheaper simply from the fact of what we're getting. If we didn't, it would find its natural price and it would actually rise a little ... I do believe in the free market."

Rep. Ed Whitfield

Rep. Ed Whitfield

R-KY

"I've been reading a number of articles recently from some quite knowledgeable people who are of the opinion that the shale oil discovery may not be quite the bonanza that we expect it to be ... And so because of the direct link between oil and gasoline prices – and that's always a hot political topic here in the US – anything about oil exports is going to be a little bit more dicey an issue ... [his subcommittee plans to hold a number of hearings on the topic next year to] get more of the facts."

Sen. Ron Wyden

Sen. Ron Wyden

D-OR, Senate Energy Committee Chair

"There may be a time when crude oil exports are appropriate, but is now that time? ... The US is still importing about half our oil, including from some places that don't always have America's best interest in mind."

Tyson Slocum

Tyson Slocum

Director, Public Citizen Energy Program

"Because lifting the ban would cause U.S. benchmark oil prices to rise, companies likely would have a greater incentive to increase production... With all of the increased production coming from controversial fracking techniques, lifting the ban not only would raise gasoline prices for U.S. families, but would create bigger environmental headaches."

Mike McKenna

Mike McKenna

President, MWR Strategies; GOP Energy Strategist

"Five years from now... exporting crude is going to be fairly noncontroversial. But when in the next five years it becomes noncontroversial, I can't predict... [Backing an end to the ban is] a little risky... because every time gas prices go up, you're going to wind up getting dinged... When most people think about energy independence, they don't think about a great big wall around the country... They think about, 'Could the U.S., if we needed to, supply all of our own energy?'"

Oil Change International

Oil Change International

"In order to play its part in meeting global climate goals, it is imperative that the United States maintains the ban on crude oil exports and does everything it can to decrease, rather than increase, the global pool of fossil fuel reserves that are exploited."

Wells Fargo

Wells Fargo

"Having analyzed the data regarding crude oil prices and U.S. wholesale gasoline prices, we are comfortable stating that U.S. gasoline consumers are benefiting from the inability to freely export U.S. produced crude oil... We provide evidence that U.S. gasoline consumers are benefiting from the restrictions on crude oil exports."

Janet Mullins Grissom

Janet Mullins Grissom

Partner, Peck, Madigan, Jones; Lobbyist, Consumers and Refiners United for Domestic Energy (CRUDE)

"Why is it that our gas prices haven't spiked during this turmoil in the Middle East the way they did a few years ago? ... Because we've got all this domestic supply [that cannot be sent overseas]."

Sen. Robert Menendez

Sen. Robert Menendez

D-NJ, Chairman, Senate Foreign Relations Committee

"Lifting the crude oil export ban means Big Oil will export oil until the world price and the American price are the same. We should keep American oil in America just as we have for the last 40 years."

Daniel J. Weiss

Daniel J. Weiss

Senior Vice President of Campaigns, League of Conservation Voters; former Senior Fellow and Director of Climate Strategy Center at American Progress

"Selling crude oil at a higher price on the world market would pad the bank accounts of oil companies, but it could also raise gasoline prices at home and increase our imports. To protect the pocketbooks of families and businesses and maintain our energy security, we should keep American oil here at home."

Sen. Edward J. Markey

Sen. Edward J. Markey

D-MA

"[The Commerce decision] puts America on a slippery slope to send more of our oil abroad, even at a time when the Middle East is in disarray and tensions are running high with Russia. We should keep our resources here at home for American families and businesses, not send this oil abroad even as we import oil from dangerous regions of the world ... Congress put this oil export ban in place. It should be Congress that decides when and how to change it, not through a private ruling by the Commerce Department without public debate."

Sen. John Hoeven

Sen. John Hoeven

R-ND

"We have to make sure it won't impact the price at the pump, and until we make that determination, I'm not on board."

Bill Day

Bill Day

Vice President - Communications, Valero

"The current situation is working fine and doesn't need to change. We buy oil and take it to our refineries, turn it into gasoline, diesel and other refined fuels since those are higher-valued products that help decrease the trade deficit ... It would do more harm than good and lead to higher prices in the U.S. for consumers. I don't fault oil producers for seeking to lift the ban because crude oil is selling for less in the U.S. than overseas."

Rep. Gene Green

Rep. Gene Green

D-TX

"I want to take it one step at a time. I am not just for throwing the door open to exports."

Rep. John Culberson

Rep. John Culberson

R-TX

"We need to make sure it is done in a systematic way. We need to take care of Americans' needs first."

Ilana Solomon

Ilana Solomon

Director, Responsible Trade Program at Sierra Club

"Encouraging trade in dirty fossil fuels would mean more dangerous fracking here in the U.S. and would push more climate-disrupting fuels into the European Union. The oil and gas industry is the only winner in this situation."

Graeme Burnett

Graeme Burnett

Senior Vice President - Fuels Optimization, Delta Air Lines

"If we lift the export ban we would in essence be allowing the transport of crude out of a competitive market in this country and into a less competitive global one controlled by a few oil producing states. The results would be easy to predict: U.S. crude would flow out of this country and onto the world market. OPEC would reduce supply to maintain high global prices. The United States' use of homegrown oil would diminish and prices here at home would rise to match the higher global price for a barrel of crude."

Jeffrey Peck

Jeffrey Peck

Principal, Peck Madigan Jones; Lobbyist for CRUDE, Consumers and Refiners United for Domestic Energy

"Once people understand the market for crude oil is not free, they quickly recognize traditional principles of free trade don't apply here."

Sen. Joe Manchin

Sen. Joe Manchin

D-WV

"I think basically until we become energy independent we ought to carefully consider what we do with our energy resources, absolutely."